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Online Lessons 13-14-15 Practice Test



This practice test covers these lessons -
      Lesson 13:  Financial Participation in Elections
      Lesson 14:  Congressional Elections
      Lesson 15:  Presidential Elections

Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 

 1. 

Which of the following is NOT a factor leading to increased campaign costs?
a.
building effective campaign organizations
b.
media expenses
c.
the costs of filing papers to run for elective office in the states
d.
legal and accounting costs
e.
interest on loans taken to pay for campaign debts
 

 2. 

The spending of large sums of money on political campaigns
a.
always results in victories.
b.
does not have a high correlation with winning.
c.
is decreasing with time due to the lowering costs of media.
d.
is decreasing in time due to limits placed on election spending by Congress.
e.
is of little or no concern to candidates, parties, and the electorate.
 

 3. 

Fund raising tactics for Senate and House of Representative races depend on all of the following EXCEPT
a.
direct mailings to the public.
b.
public rallies.
c.
fund-raising dinners.
d.
federal government contributions to qualifying candidates.
e.
contributions from interest groups.
 

 4. 

An institutional interest group is
a.
usually concerned with a wide variety of issues and topics that affect the institutions of government.
b.
not highly organized and is centered in the various state capitols.
c.
made up of individual citizens who have concerns on specific policy issues.
d.
generally not interested in the outcome of elections, only in the outcome of policy decisions.
e.
highly organized and represented in Washington by lobbying firms and represents specific interests, issues, or organizations.
 

 5. 

Political Action Committees
a.
are rare today due to new campaign finance laws.
b.
are growing in number and influence as costs of elections increase.
c.
are interested in the outcome of policy making and for the most part stay clear of elections and electioneering.
d.
are formed primarily to disseminate information to political leaders.
e.
were made illegal under the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002.
 

 6. 

Soft money is
a.
given to a candidate for “soft sell” advertising.
b.
totally illegal in both federal and state elections under new legislation.
c.
donations given directly to political parties for general election uses.
d.
limited to $1000 per donor.
e.
illegal if given to state parties by Political Action Committees.
 

 7. 

All of the following statements about the Federal Election Commission are true EXEPT
a.
the FEC is an independent agency of the executive branch.
b.
the FEC has a six-member board appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.
c.
the FEC monitors campaign finance data and establishes campaign finance regulations.
d.
the FEC grants public funding in presidential elections to qualified candidates.
e.
the FEC determines if a candidate is qualified for the job they seek only on the federal level.
 

 8. 

Which statement is true about congressional incumbency?
a.
In the 1700s and 1800s most Congress members made the job a life-long career.
b.
Today, most members of Congress self-impose term limits by staying in office only two or three terms.
c.
Incumbents have a very difficult time winning re-election due to the public nature of their voting record while in office.
d.
Incumbents win re-election 80 to 90 percent of the time.
e.
Congress placed term limits on incumbent in the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 in order to level the election playing field.
 

 9. 

Which is NOT an advantage that an incumbent might enjoy in a congressional election?
a.
name recognition by the electorate
b.
incumbents do not have to run in primary elections
c.
PACs are more willing to give them contributions
d.
incumbents can gain access to the media by credit claiming and promoting an issue or bill on the floor of Congress
e.
franking privileges can off-set costs of “news letters” to the homes of voters during election times
 

 10. 

In so-called off-year or mid-term elections,
a.
candidates must appeal to highly motivated, partisan voters.
b.
candidates must look to the entire possible electorate for votes.
c.
candidates can seldom rely on help from the party.
d.
incumbents of the party in power often have very easy, unopposed elections.
e.
PACs seldom give funds or care about the outcome as much as they do during a presidential election year.
 

 11. 

A candidate for the House of Representatives must be all of the following, according to the Constitution, EXCEPT
a.
at least 25 years old.
b.
a citizen of the state in which he/she is running.
c.
a registered voter for the party they represent.
d.
a citizen of the United States.
e.
have lived in the United States for at least seven years.
 

 12. 

Elections for the House of Representatives are
a.
held in each of the 435 districts every two years.
b.
held in 1/3 of the 435 districts every two years, thus rotating the membership.
c.
only held in marginal districts bi-annually.
d.
based on a proportional representation system.
e.
not monitored by the Federal Election Commission.
 

 13. 

Which of the following statements concerning Senatorial elections is NOT true?
a.
Senators run for office every six years.
b.
The Seventeenth Amendment changed the election of senators to a popular vote.
c.
Candidates must be 30 years old to run for the office of US Senate.
d.
Senate races tend to be much cheaper than House races.
e.
Approximately 1/3 of the Senate runs for re-election every two years.
 

 14. 

Senate elections are
a.
more expensive than House races.
b.
less expensive than House races.
c.
more in the headlines since there are fewer Senators than House members.
d.
held in the various congressional districts in each state.
e.
none of these
 

 15. 

According to the Constitution, to qualify as a candidate for president you must meet all of the following EXCEPT
a.
be at least 35 years old.
b.
be a United States citizen.
c.
be a member of a legitimate political party.
d.
be born on American soil.
e.
have lived in the United States for fourteen years.
 

 16. 

In all but two states, the system of winning the electoral votes for president are
a.
determined each election by the state legislatures.
b.
proportional to the votes received.
c.
on a winner-take-all basis.
d.
done on formulas based on the number of candidates and the total votes cast.
e.
set by the governors election by election.
 

 17. 

Following the popular vote general election in November for president,
a.
the electors meet and decide if a clear majority has been established.
b.
the new president is declared elected by the Federal Election Commission.
c.
if the winner does not have a majority of the popular vote, the election goes to the House of Representatives.
d.
the presidential electors meet (usually at the capital of their state) and cast their ballots to determine who wins the presidency.
e.
the Supreme Court certifies the vote, determines which candidate received a plurality of the electoral college votes, and declares the winner.
 

 18. 

When states hold presidential caucuses they are
a.
avoiding having a general presidential election.
b.
deciding the rules for the presidential primary in their state.
c.
actually holding what are commonly known as blanket primaries.
d.
allowing the urban machines to select the state’s candidates for the general election.
e.
allowing parties to use a delegate system to select which candidate will receive the party’s support at the national convention.
 

 19. 

The advantage of a candidate winning or doing well in the Iowa Caucuses and the New Hampshire primary is
a.
they gain name recognition and are able to raise necessary money easier than those who do not show well.
b.
they automatically receive federal dollars for their campaign.
c.
they are the only ones selected for the national debates.
d.
they can by-pass all future primaries and go straight to the conventions, which allows them to save money for the general election.
e.
by law only those who place first, second, or third in these two primaries can run in future primaries.
 

 20. 

If a presidential election is thrown into the House of Representatives
a.
each member has one vote but it requires a 2/3 vote to win.
b.
each state gets the same number of votes as its electoral college vote.
c.
each member has one vote and majority rules.
d.
each state’s delegation in the House gets one vote regardless of the size of the state.
e.
each state’s delegation gets one vote and in the case of a tie, the Vice President casts the deciding vote.
 



 
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