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Online Lessons 7-8 Practice Test



This quiz covers these lessons -
In the Edwards text, Government in America, Chapter 3: Federalism
and
University of California Open Access APGovPol Course
Online Unit I: Underpinnings and Documents of American Government
Chapter 3 Online:  American Federalism
     Online Lesson 7:  Layer Cake Federalism
     Online Lesson 8:  Evolution of Federalism

Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 

 1. 

The type of government with a weak national government and strong regional or state governments is known as a
a.
confederation.
b.
federation.
c.
unitary government.
d.
democracy.
e.
parliamentary government.
 

 2. 

In a unitary government,
a.
power is dispersed to regional or state units.
b.
power is found in the executive branch only.
c.
power is concentrated in the central government.
d.
power is equally dispersed between the central and local governments.
e.
power is concentrated in the legislative branches.
 

 3. 

The United States Constitution’s Supremacy Clause
a.
applies only to local and not to state governments.
b.
is vague and does not really establish the desires of the Founders for national power.
c.
makes the President the Supreme power in the United States.
d.
creates a “super nation” that is supreme to all other nations in the Western Hemisphere.
e.
made the Constitution, federal treaties, and federal laws the supreme law of the land.
 

 4. 

Which of the following best expresses the intent of the Tenth Amendment?
a.
National law is always supreme over state law.
b.
Just because the Bill of Rights does not specifically enumerate a right, that right may still exist.
c.
It was meant to bind the states to the Bill of Rights.
d.
It was meant to ensure the states had certain rights that could not be taken away by the national government.
e.
It was meant to ensure freedom of the press in the states.
 

 5. 

The Supreme Court ruled in McCulloch v. Maryland that
a.
judicial review should exist as a regular practice of the Court.
b.
the national government is supreme over the state governments.
c.
the state governments are supreme over the national government.
d.
judicial restraint was the procedure that the federal courts must follow.
e.
Maryland and all other states did not have to follow national banking laws.
 

 6. 

National policies and laws that allow for the building of roads, regulating the environment, monitoring our nation’s food and drug supplies, and regulating businesses and communication are constitutionally permitted as
a.
reserved powers.
b.
enumerated powers.
c.
sovereign powers.
d.
categorical powers.
e.
implied powers.
 

 7. 

The Supreme Court in its ruling in the Gibbons vs. Ogden (1824) case attempted to define commerce
a.
very narrowly.
b.
in a manner that would prohibit Congress from regulating it.
c.
very broadly.
d.
by listing the specific aspects of commerce that could be regulated.
e.
by avoiding the direct definition and calling for a case-by-case study of all commercial activity.
 

 8. 

Marriage licenses and drivers licenses are valid from one state to the next under the
a.
implied power doctrine.
b.
full faith and credit clause of Article Four.
c.
enumerated power doctrine.
d.
the doctrine of reciprocity found in Article Five.
e.
the privileges and immunities clause found in Article One.
 

 9. 

Layer-cake Federalism describes a system where powers and policy making are assigned to distinct parts of the government such as national, state, or local. This type of federalism is often called
a.
cooperative federalism.
b.
anti-federalism.
c.
tri-partite federalism.
d.
fiscal federalism.
e.
dual federalism.
 

 10. 

The allocation of power in cooperative and fiscal federalism is sometimes described as
a.
single-layer cake federalism, due to its unitary nature.
b.
layer-cake federalism, because of the layers of bureaucracy necessary.
c.
a cake walk, because whoever is left standing loses.
d.
birthday cake federalism, because the national government gives “gifts” to the states.
e.
marble-cake federalism, because the lines between state and national responsibility are mixed up.
 

 11. 

Which of the following would be an example of cooperative federalism?
a.
interstate highway funding
b.
Congress funding a war overseas
c.
personal property taxes
d.
a grant given by the national government to a college to research a new technology
e.
California’s legislature passing a bill to increase the funding of public schools through a new sales tax
 

 12. 

In fiscal and cooperative federalism, standard procedures would include all of the following EXCEPT:
a.
block grants.
b.
categorical grants.
c.
grants with no regulations or guidelines for the states.
d.
federal guidelines and regulations for shared programs.
e.
sharing of administration and implementation agencies.
 

 13. 

In cooperative and fiscal federalism, cities and states that want to receive funding from the national government (as in the case of No Child Left Behind for education) must
a.
allow the federal government to totally administer the funds and programs.
b.
match funding dollar per dollar.
c.
create new bureaucracies for each of the new federal programs.
d.
follow federal guidelines and enforce federal rules and regulations.
e.
seek permission from the citizens with referendums prior to accepting the funds.
 

 14. 

Congress’ main instrument in aiding and influencing states is
a.
judicial decisions.
b.
revenue sharing.
c.
executive orders.
d.
mandates.
e.
grants-in-aid.
 

 15. 

A state wanting highway dollars from the national government must pass and enforce seatbelt laws. This is an example of
a.
strings attached to grants-in-aid.
b.
a project grant.
c.
revenue sharing prior to the Reagan administration.
d.
a formula grant.
e.
dual federalism.
 

 16. 

Most aid that states and cities receive from the federal government come in the form of
a.
disaster or FEMA loans.
b.
block grants.
c.
categorical grants.
d.
revenue sharing.
e.
specialized bonds.
 

 17. 

Many states and their representatives in Congress would prefer block grants when seeking federal funding. This is true because
a.
federal block grants are larger sums and can be stretched further by state governments.
b.
this is a form of pork barrel legislation.
c.
block grants decrease the amount of regulation and rules attached to the funding compared to other types of grants-in-aid.
d.
block grants are totally administered by the federal government.
e.
other grants-in-aid are more difficult to get passed by Congress.
 

 18. 

When state or local demographics are the main factors in distributing grant-in-aid funding, the grants can usually be described as
a.
block grants.
b.
formula grants.
c.
standard project grants.
d.
discretionary spending.
e.
deficit spending.
 

 19. 

Grants-in-aid given to states and local government who then can then decide how to use the funds with little or no federal intervention are called
a.
project grants.
b.
categorical grants.
c.
reverse grants.
d.
block grants.
e.
formula grants.
 

 20. 

Which of the following issues would the states LEAST likely have policy-making influence over, compared to the federal government?
a.
social issues of the region
b.
economic issues of the region
c.
family issues such as marriage or divorce law
d.
police powers that govern the behavior of law enforcement
e.
moral concerns of the community over obscenity or nudity
 



 
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