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Executive Branch Practice Test



Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 

 1. 

Chief executive officers in government might have which of the following titles?
a.
mayors, city councilmen, state senators
b.
presidents, mayors, governors
c.
congressmen, senators, legislators
d.
presidents, governors, justices
e.
all of these are chief executives in government
 

 2. 

The main responsibility of public officials who are elected to be chief executives in government positions is
a.
to pass laws, rules and regulations for the members of a society to obey.
b.
to enforce the laws, rules and regulations passed by lawmakers.
c.
to interpret the meaning of laws after they are passed by legislatures.
d.
to appoint members of the Electoral College, so that a President may be legally chosen and inaugurated.
e.
all of these are equally important responsibilities of chief executives in government.
 

 3. 

According to the U.S. Constitution, in order to take office as President of the United States, a person must
a.
have been born in the United States.
b.
have listened to classic rock and roll during most of their adult lives.
c.
have extensive political experience.
d.
be at least 55 years old.
e.
be a naturalized citizen.
 

 4. 

When the President of the U.S. is acting as the symbolic leader of the government (going to foreign capitals to negotiate and sign treaties, traveling to funerals of important officials from other nations, etc.), political scientists call this presidential role the
a.
chief of state.
b.
chief executive.
c.
politico role.
d.
commander-in-chief.
e.
None of these is a correct answer.
 

 5. 

At the Constitutional Convention in 1787, delegates came to a compromise on the term of office of presidents, agreeing to a 4-year presidential term of office with the possibility of re-election, and
a.
a 1-term limit.
b.
a 2-term limit.
c.
a 3-term limit.
d.
a 10-term limit.
e.
no limit on the number of terms office for which someone could be elected.
 

 6. 

Which of the following set the historical precedent of the “two-term presidency”?
a.
Franklin Roosevelt
b.
The Presidential Succession Act of 1947
c.
George Washington
d.
The Bill of Rights
e.
The 13th Amendment
 

 7. 

President ___?___  broke the “two-term presidency” rule that had been followed by presidents for over a century, and was elected to more than two terms of office.
a.
Ronald Reagan
b.
Franklin Roosevelt
c.
George Washington
d.
Dwight D. Eisenhower
e.
Abraham Lincoln
 

 8. 

Which of the following amendments to the U.S. Constitution set a limit of no more than two terms, or a total of ten years in office, for presidents?
a.
8th Amendment
b.
15th Amendment
c.
22nd Amendment
d.
24th Amendment
e.
None of these answers is correct.
 

 9. 

When governors and presidents are officially sworn into their office, it is called
a.
inauguration.
b.
presidential succession.
c.
a traditional, but unofficial, requirement for the office.
d.
a system of electoral votes.
e.
a slate of electors.
 

 10. 

Which of the following best reflects the official (from 1947) succession to the presidency, if the president and vice president should die, resign, or somehow be removed from office?
a.
Speaker of the House, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, Secretary of State, Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of Defense
b.
President of the Senate, Speaker of the House, and the Cabinet officials in the order of the creation of their office
c.
President Pro Tempore of the Senate, Speaker of the House, Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of State
d.
Speaker of the House, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of State, Attorney General
e.
Secretary of State, Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of War, Attorney General, Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of the Interior
 

 11. 

Which of the following government officials may be removed from office through impeachment?
a.
presidents
b.
vice presidents
c.
federal judges
d.
members of the president’s Cabinet
e.
All of these are correct answers.
 

 12. 

Only the  ___?___ can vote to impeach a President of the U.S. through passing articles of impeachment.
a.
Electoral College
b.
U.S. Senate
c.
U.S. House of Representatives
d.
two major political parties
e.
U.S. Supreme Court
 

 13. 

Besides waiting around to succeed to the presidency, the Vice President’s only other constitutional duty is to preside over the debates in ___?___ .
a.
the Senate.
b.
the House of Representatives.
c.
the Electoral College.
d.
the Committee of the Whole.
e.
a new constitutional convention.
 

 14. 

In presidential elections, each state’s electoral vote is equal to the number of
a.
Senators and Representatives it has in Congress.
b.
3/5 of the population of the state.
c.
the entire membership of the House and Senate in Washington, D.C.
d.
the entire population of that state.
e.
Representatives it has in Congress.
 

 15. 

In order to be elected to the U.S. presidency, a person must win ___?___ of the nation’s Electoral Votes.
a.
at least half plus one, a simple majority
b.
at least 3/5
c.
at least 2/3, a supermajority
d.
at least 3/4, a supermajority
e.
all of the total
 

 16. 

A regulation issued by the President to help enforce a treaty, a law, or a court ruling is an
a.
executive plan.
b.
amnesty.
c.
executive order.
d.
pardon.
e.
honoraria.
 

 17. 

Which of the following federal officials may the President dismiss from federal employment?
a.
the vice president
b.
federal judges
c.
the department secretaries of his Cabinet
d.
state governors
e.
members of Congress
 

 18. 

The President's right to withhold certain kinds of information from Congress and the courts is known as
a.
immunity.
b.
impoundment.
c.
executive orders.
d.
executive privilege
e.
filibuster.
 

 19. 

Treaties negotiated by the President and his staff must be ratified by
a.
a two-thirds vote of the Senate.
b.
ratifying conventions in the state legislatures.
c.
a majority vote of both houses of Congress.
d.
a majority of the members of the Supreme Court.
e.
a majority vote of his Cabinet.
 

 20. 

Which of the following groups cannot be pardoned by the President?
a.
persons convicted of federal crimes
b.
persons convicted of capitol crimes (where the death penalty applies)
c.
persons who have been impeached, convicted, and removed from a federal office
d.
persons who have been convicted of treason against the United States
e.
None of these groups of people can be pardoned by the President.
 

 21. 

A President's right to refuse to spend money already authorized by Congress is known as the right of
a.
eminent domain.
b.
impoundment.
c.
financial disrepute.
d.
executive impedance.
e.
executive agreement.
 

 22. 

Which of the following is true of religious freedom in seventeenth-century Europe?
a.
Few nations had established churches.
b.
The churches condemned dissenters, but the governments protected them.
c.
Wars were fought over the right of an individual to religious freedom.
d.
Religious uniformity was thought to be essential to public order.
e.
Religious uniformity had nothing to do with ideas about public order.
 

 23. 

The highest-ranking diplomats the U.S. sends to foreign nations are known as
a.
centurians.
b.
ambassadors.
c.
department secretaries.
d.
commissioners.
e.
envoys.
 

 24. 

Which of the following presidents is consistently rated by historians and political scientists as among the nation's best?
a.
Warren G. Harding
b.
Herbert Hoover
c.
Franklin Roosevelt
d.
Calvin Coolidge
e.
Franklin Pierce
 

 25. 

The group within the Executive Office of the President that is called into session whenever there is a domestic or international crisis is the
a.
National Security Council.
b.
Central Intelligence Agency.
c.
Cabinet.
d.
Domestic Office.
 

 26. 

The group that is charged with evaluating the organization and operations of the entire executive branch and analyzing estimates of federal spending is the
a.
Cabinet.
b.
National Security Council.
c.
Council of Economic Advisers.
d.
Office of Management and Budget.
 

 27. 

Cabinet members are
a.
members of the civil service.
b.
appointed by Congress.
c.
appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate.
d.
appointed for life by the President.
 

 28. 

Agencies in the federal government that provide commercial services to the public are known as
a.
government corporations.
b.
independent regulatory commissions.
c.
executive agencies.
d.
government contractors.
 

 29. 

The "spoils system" of awarding supporters jobs in a new presidential administration began under the administration of
a.
George Washington.
b.
Andrew Jackson.
c.
William Henry Harrison.
d.
Thomas Jefferson.
 

 30. 

Under the Pendleton Act, unelected government employees were hired and promoted on the basis of
a.
whether or not you were an armed services veteran.
b.
the amount of seniority you had in government service.
c.
affirmative action.
d.
merit.
 

 31. 

Under the Civil Service system, successful job applicants must
a.
be college graduates.
b.
be members of the political party in power.
c.
have "connections" within the government.
d.
compete for their jobs by taking exams.
 



 
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